FARM 996

A number of people have asked what “FARM 996” means. If you haven’t read all the blog posts, I could see why that would be a good question. Despite the fact that Porsche made tractors, it doesn’t mean everything they make is farm equipment.

It occurred to me that I have the story documented over a few posts showing how the car earned its name. But I don’t have a concise, quick read story… at least on this site. Below is the story, but you can also read it on the Porsche website or the “Car blog” section of the Petersen Automotive Museum website (with one slight edit)…

A True Barn Find

In the very literal meaning of the phrase, this 996 is a true barn find. It was important to find the perfect 996, and for me that meant something well maintained with moderate mileage, well optioned, and a great color scheme. This car had to serve the dual purpose as my daily driver and my fun car; I use it just as much to commute to work as I do to drive spiritedly through twisty mountain roads. This car gets driven.

While I’ve wanted a Porsche 911 ever since I can remember, I didn’t seriously look for one until January, 2017. After an exhaustive two or three day search, this Orient Red Metallic 996 popped up on the internet. It was quite literally the only example I had found that wasn’t Silver, Gray, White, or Black. But it was on the other side of the country, near Atlanta, Georgia. On a farm.

After an exchange of 110 emails, hundreds of photos, and too many texts and phone calls of which to keep track, I got to know the previous owner very well. He was a car collector with about 16 cars in his collection who lived on a farm, complete with horses and goats (and this car, amongst others, were stored in a barn). The sensationalized IMS Bearing had been resolved by the people who invented the fix, the car was in great shape mechanically and cosmetically, and it needed no immediate work. It was also custom ordered as part of the Porsche Exclusive program by its original owner. I asked every question imaginable, and even located a Porsche specialist in Georgia so I could have them perform a PPI.

Everything was perfect, every box was ticked. This was the car. We made the deal, I sent the money, the car was shipped. Waiting for the 996 to arrive was the longest ten days of my life. On delivery day, it was a sight to behold. There it was, right in front of me. It was beautiful, the paint was shiny and sleek—in fact, it looked better in person than any of the photos I had seen. Everything exceeded my expectations… except for, maybe, one tiny surprise.

When I opened the door ready to inhale the inviting scent of a full-leather interior and sit in my 996 for the first time, I was immediately overtaken by a most unwelcome symphony of malodorous animal droppings—as if I had been unwittingly transported to that farm in Georgia. There’s just some questions you’d never think to ask when purchasing a car, “does it smell like horse shit?” is one of those questions.

2 thoughts on “FARM 996

  1. Mitchell Z

    Just watched your sweet ride on the Cars & Coffee, one question is that a Porsche classic radio? I have a 996 GT 3 and I was thinking about putting that radio in my car glad to see it works thanks.

    Like

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